David Hammond: About the Artist

 

  

Click here to listen to his interview.

David Hammond is a former resident director for the American Conservatory Theater and the Yale Repertory Theatre and Artistic Director Emeritus of PlayMakers Repertory Company. He has directed productions for New York’s Roundabout Theatre Company, the Dallas Shakespeare Festival, the Sherwood Shakespeare Festival, the Utah Shakespeare Festival, the Valley Shakespeare Festival, the American Repertory Theater and the Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts, as well as the Comedia Nacional, Teatro El Galpon, Teatro Alianza and Teatro Telon Rojo in Montevideo, Uruguay. He has staged operas for the San Francisco Opera, the Aspen Music Festival, the Carmel Bach Festival and the Opera Company of North Carolina. A Shakespeare specialist, he has conducted workshops or coached Shakespeare texts for the Actors Theatre of Louisville, the Denver Center Theatre Company, the Atlantic Theater Company and New York’s Actors Center.

He has taught at the Juilliard School, the Yale School of Drama, the American Conservatory Theater Advanced Training Program, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the New York University Graduate Acting Program at Tisch School of the Arts and the American Repertory Theater/Moscow Art Theater School Institute for Advanced Theater Training at Harvard University. In Uruguay, he has taught for Escuela de Expression Teatral Anglo Ombu, Escuela Multidisciplinaria de Arte Dramatico, Institucion Teatral El Galpon, Federacion Uruguaya de Teatros Independentes, Escuela del Cine and Escuela del Actor. As a Cultural Specialist for Arts America, he has also conducted workshops and seminars in Mexico, Argentina, and Chile.

Hammond is a B.A. magna cum laude graduate of Harvard College, an M.F.A. graduate of Carnegie-Mellon University and a recipient of two Los Angeles Drama-Logue awards, two Triangle Theater Awards, a Playmaker Award for Lifetime Achievement and the Florencio Award of the Association of Uruguayan Theater Critics.